Winter 2009

A Quarterly Newsletter of the Instrumentation Testing Association

ITA Enews

Spring 2011

††††††††††† rishna Pagilla, Ph.D., P.E., IWA Fellow and Professor of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering for Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) in Chicago, Illinois is beginning the TOC research project correlation study at the San Francisco, Public Utilities Commission (PUC), Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Bonnie Jones, Senior Engineer and Alexandre Miot, Assistant Engineer of the San Francisco PUC (SFPUC) are working with Professor Pagilla to demonstrate a long-term correlation of TOC to BOD5 and COD to offer a faster, more accurate and cost-effective measurement as an alternative to measuring BOD5 at the Oceanside wastewater treatment plant (WWTP).

Instrumentation Testing Association† (ITA)

 

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IIT Begins TOC Correlation Study at San Francisco Oceanside WWTP

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OCEANSIDE TREATMENT PROCESS

The Oceanside WWTP plant (pictured above) was commissioned in 1993 and is built on 12 acres with 70% located underground. The Plant treats an average dry weather flow of about 14 million gallons a day and has a total capacity of 65 million gallons during wet weather. It treats wastewater from the west side of San Francisco. Treated wastewater is discharged from the plant 4.0 miles to the Pacific Ocean through the Southwest Ocean Outfall.

Secondary treatment consists of a high-purity oxygen activated sludge process, secondary clarification, and return activated sludge pumping. The aeration process consists of three parallel trains, each composed of six stages in series. The first three stages were converted to anaerobic selectors about 5 years ago for filamentous control. The high-purity oxygen activated sludge process was selected to minimize space requirements, facilitate the containment and collection of odors and aerosols, and optimize treatment of the variable pollutant loads.

San Francisco Public Utility Commissionís

Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant

San Francisco, California

Krishna Pagilla, Ph.D., P.E., IWA Fellow, Professor

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Illinois Institute of Technology

Chicago, Illinois

Alexandre Miot, Assistant Engineer and Bonnie Jones, Senior Engineer† of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant Begin Sampling and Testing for the

TOC Research Project Correlation Study†

Bonnie Jones

Bonnie Jones has been with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, Water Pollution Control Division for the past 11 years.  In addition, to tracking process parameters and managing biosolids, she has been involved in monitoring the efficacy of the combined sewer system and assisting with developing the Sewer System Master Plan that led to the upcoming 30-year capital program - the Sewer system Improvement Program.  She has her Masterís degree in Sanitary Engineering from U.C. Berkeley, worked in research at the Richmond Field Station (U.C. Berkeley) and was a regulator at the Stinson Beach County Water District for the Onsite Wastewater Management Program.

Alexandre Miot

Alexandre Miot has been working with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, Wastewater Enterprise for over 2 years. He is currently the Oceanside plant process engineer. He is involved in R&D projects aiming to improve process performance and reduce operating cost. Those projects include the optimization of the anaerobic selector and the implementation of a dissolved oxygen based system to control the oxygen feed to the pure oxygen activated sludge plant. He has his Masterís degree in Environmental Engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Prior to moving to the United States, Alexandre worked for five years with Lyonnaise des Eaux in France.

TOC CORRELATION STUDY

TOC, BOD5 and COD measurements will be taken at two locations within the Oceanside WWTP process; 1.)† Primary Effluent and 2.) Final Effluent (monthly average process characteristics are listed in the tables above).† Samples will be taken and tested once per week for one year. In addition, measurements will be taken on a daily basis for two weeks during the Winter and Summer months. The TOC to BOD5 and COD correlation study results will help the Oceanside WWTP to define parameters for potentially changing the operation of their treatment plant by using TOC instead of BOD5. Additionally, online TOC analyzers may be useful in determining carbon loading to the secondary treatment process and may be able to be used for feed forward control of their secondary aeration process.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ITA is grateful to its membership for making the TOC Research Project correlation study possible through† annual membership dues.† ITA is also grateful to San Francisco Public Utilities Commission for donating staff time and resources to the TOC correlation study and is especially grateful to Dr. Krishna Pagilla of Illinois Institute of Technology.†

Please contact ITA to find out more about the benefits of providing funding contributions to the TOC research project and to learn how your treatment plant can become involved.

K

Oceanside WWTP Primary Effluent Process Characteristics

(2009 Monthly Average Data)

Parameter

Range (mg/L)

Average (mg/L)

Primary Effluent

 

Total Suspended Solids (TSS)

278-520

368

Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD)

ND

ND

Total Organic Carbon (TOC)

ND

ND

Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD)

583-943

736

pH

7.6-8.1

8.0

Oceanside WWTP Final Effluent Process Characteristics

(2009 Monthly Average Data)

Parameter

Range (mg/L)

Average (mg/L)

Final Effluent

 

Total Suspended Solids (TSS)

9-17

12.5

Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD)

9-25

16.9

Total Organic Carbon (TOC)

ND

ND

Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD)

44-60

50

pH

6.6-6.8

6.7